Showing posts tagged bebop

John Coltrane - Consequences (1966)

Sometimes when I listen to a local band, I can’t tell if they’re geniuses in disguise or schizophrenics on speed.

time-thedonutoftheheart:

Thelonious Monk

(Source: chop-loops)

smithsonian:

Dizzy Gillespie’s B-flat Trumpet, 1972


This week’s Smithsonian Snapshot celebrates Jazz Appreciation Month with American jazz legend John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie’s trumpet. 
 
In the 1940s, Gillespie, renowned for his harmonic complexity and scat singing, became a major figure in developing the modern jazz style known as bebop. Gillespie pushed the technical virtuosity of the trumpet, wrote influential compositions, helped introduce Afro-Cuban rhythms into jazz and through his showmanship helped spread the popularity of bebop.
 

In 1986, Gillespie donated this custom “Silver Flair” trumpet, which he played for 10 years, and its custom case to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Its uniquely shaped upturned bell was his internationally known trademark.
 

Gillespie’s trumpet is one of the most iconic instruments in American music; its inclusion in the Smithsonian marks him as one of the most influential and innovative 20th-century American musicians.
 

To learn more about the importance of jazz in culture, technology, gender and race, visit the Smithsonian’s Jazz Appreciation Month 2012 website. To hear musical recordings of Gillespie and other jazz musicians, visit the Smithsonian Folkways’ website.
 

This item is one of 137 million artifacts, works of art and specimens in the Smithsonian’s collection. It is on display in the National Museum of American History’s Artifact Wall. To learn more about this item, visit the National Museum of American History’s website
nprmusic:

Happy birthday, Herbie Hancock!
The keyboardist played in Miles Davis’ “second great quintet,” wrote classics spanning the music spectrum — from the game-changing post-bop of “Watermelon Man” to, yes, “Rockit” — and generally has one of the coolest, funkiest synth collections around. 
Hear Herbie Hancock in a synth-heavy set from the 2008 Newport Jazz Festival.
Hancock also sat in with Marian McPartland for an episode of Piano Jazz in 1987. 

nprmusic:

Happy birthday, Herbie Hancock!

The keyboardist played in Miles Davis’ “second great quintet,” wrote classics spanning the music spectrum — from the game-changing post-bop of “Watermelon Man” to, yes, “Rockit” — and generally has one of the coolest, funkiest synth collections around. 

Hear Herbie Hancock in a synth-heavy set from the 2008 Newport Jazz Festival.

Hancock also sat in with Marian McPartland for an episode of Piano Jazz in 1987. 

"Blue Rondo a la Turk" - Dave Brubeck, a guitar cover! Wonderfully done!

A little sharing

One of the things I’ve always loved about rap is sampling. Putting a few bars of another song on repeat and putting some lyrics (and the occasional scratch or synth) over it can result in very catchy and classy sounding tunes. I know some people view this as butchering or trashing music. However, I’ve noticed more and more people getting into jazz and funk after hearing a chopped up beat from a rap/hip-hop tune. And there’s absolutely nothing bad about getting into jazz! 

Juggaknots - “Trouble Man”sampled John Coltrane - “My Favorite Things”

Dr. Dre - “Let Me Ride” sampled Parliament Funkadelic - “Swing Down Sweet Chariot” - “Mothership Connection”

The Pharcyde- “Passing Me By” sampled Quincy Jones- “Summer In The City”

US3 - “Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)” sampled Herbie Hancock- “Cantaloupe Island”

Wu-Tang Clan - “Shame on a Nigga” sampled Thelonious Monk - “Black And Tan Fantasy”

Now this list could go on and on and on. If you have any favorites, please do share! I personally have a soft-spot for West-Coast style rap, so any more examples of that would be appreciated! A few more things to check out:

Top 10 Samples in Hip-Hop History - Part I

Hip Hop Samples Pt. 1

Hip-hop meets Jazz

Max Roach and Dizzy Gillespie- 1989

My favorite bebop pianist! Thelonious Monk’s lesson on music.

Things I like